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Sedation Dentistry


Oral Sedation

Depending on the total dose given, oral sedation can range from minimal to moderate. For minimal sedation, you take a pill. Typically, the pill is Halcion, Valium or Ativan and it's usually taken about an hour before the procedure. The pill will make you drowsy, although you'll still be awake. A larger dose may be given to produce moderate sedation. Some people become groggy enough from moderate oral sedation to actually fall asleep during the procedure. They can, though, be awakened with a gentle shake.

Sedation dentistry has become very popular because it offers several benefits for the patient:

  • It works effectively for mild to moderate fear
  • It is safe! You take 1-2 sedative pills prior to your visit
  • You will have very little memory of the procedure
  • You will be sedated for several hours after you take the pills
  • It is effective for procedures such as porcelain crowns, cosmetic veneers & Dental Implants
  • You will need a companion to drive you to & from your appointment

Laughing Gas

You breathe nitrous oxide, otherwise known as laughing gas, combined with oxygen through a mask that's placed over your nose. The gas helps you relax. The doctor and dental assistant are an experienced team and can control the amount of sedation you receive. At the end of your treatment, the gas you are inhaling is changed back to pure oxygen. This change gradually reverses the relaxation effect of the nitrous oxide. You leave able to perform normal functions like driving or returning to work.

Conscience Sedation

Conscience sedation is a combination of laughing gas and oral sedation. When this combination is used, the patient's blood pressure and blood oxygen saturation is being monitored by a pulse oximeter. A sensor is placed on a thin part of the patient's body, usually a fingertip, for assessment of a patient's oxygenation and determining the effectiveness of or need for supplemental oxygen.

 
 

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